Anchor Lighting Requirements and Regulations for Boats

Colliding with another boat at sea is extremely dangerous and should be avoided at all costs. In order to prevent such accidents, the US Coast Guard implemented a set of regulations for anchored vessels, which includes lights. Rule 30 in the USCG handbook recommends the application of lights around anchored boats for streamlined and safe detection. Read on to learn more about this marine anchor lighting regulation.

 

Rule 30

 

According to Rule 30, an anchored boat must display a visible light. Specifically, an all-around white light or one ball should be installed and used during such activities in the water. Furthermore, a luminary can be installed close to the stern for maximum visibility (also a white light).

 

As with most USCG guidelines available today, there are some exceptions to consider when observing Rule 30. First, a boat that measures less than 50 meters does not have to observe all of the recommendations above. Units at sea measuring less than 12 meters in length are not included in Rule 30; though lights should be applied for safety.

 

Types of Anchor Lights for Boats

 

There are several types of anchor lights in the market, which can improve compliance and visibility during anchoring. The most common type is a luminary that emits 360 degrees of white light, mounted on a pole for elevated illumination. It is important to point out that such lamps need to adhere to a two-mile visibility requirement.

 

LEDs are a great choice for reliable anchor lights, due to their solid-state build and long lifespans. Such fixtures can withstand the rugged nature of boating operations. Lastly, a foldable or telescopic pole mount for the LED anchor light is ideal for space-saving benefits.

 

For congested docks with numerous boats in the area, a diffused LED anchor light can be used to reduce blinding or glare.